Each semester the Koehler Center partners with faculty to support Faculty-Led Workshops. These are events organized and promoted by the Koehler Center, but they are developed and led by TCU faculty to help enrich the TCU community. There are two types of events: Teaching and Learning Conversations (TLCs) and Pedagogy in Practice Workshops (PinPs).

Register for upcoming Faculty-Led Workshops below or on our Events page.

View the archive for information about past TLCs and PinPs.


Teaching and learning conversations

You Belong: How a Residential Framework of Caring Relationships Enhances Learning
with Dr. Jason Titus

September 16, 2022 from 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Jason Titus

Jason Titus

In 2008, staff from TCU traveled to Shreveport, Louisiana, to gain insight into Community Renewal International (CRI) and its neighborhood restoration model. TCU Housing staff worked with the CRI team to build a similar model within TCU residential communities to improve student relationships, sense of community, and belonging on campus.

This workshop discusses the fruits of this work, which produced the Knowing. Connecting. Empowering. Residential Framework (KCE). KCE can provide increased belonging in the classroom and programmatic experiences across campus—just as it does in our TCU residential communities—to deliver higher levels of student learning and engagement.

By participating in this workshop, you will:

  • Learn the history and current components of the KCE Residential Framework
  • Learn how the KCE Residential Framework can translate into classroom and programmatic experiences
  • Create a plan of implementation for components of the KCE Residential Framework to positively impact your work

Teaching and learning conversations

Using Student Response Systems Effectively
with Dr. Ashley Coles

September 19, 2022 from 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Ashley Coles

Ashley Coles

Many faculty at TCU are using student response systems (SRS) such as clickers and polling software to promote student learning and engagement in fun and creative ways.

This Teaching and Learning Conversation is intended for faculty to share their strategies and experiences with SRS. If you use SRS or are thinking about implementing their use in your classroom, please join us to discuss best practices for effective and engaging classroom activities.

 

 


pedagogy in practice

Using the Theory of Synectics to Make Meaningful Connections
with Dr. LaTrina Parker Hall

September 29, 2022 from 12:30 PM – 2:30 PM

LaTrina Parker Hall

LaTrina Parker Hall

Synectics is a problem-solving technique, which promotes creative thinking, usually among small groups of people with diverse expertise or backgrounds. The theory of synectics builds on the belief that strong connections can be made between disparate subjects to effectively and meaningfully solve challenging problems and develop creative ideas. Synectics also provides a framework for stronger connections and synergy among collaborators.

In this workshop, Dr. LaTrina Parker Hall will share her personal and professional experiences utilizing synectics as a strategy to make meaningful connections to complex situations while working with students, partners, and colleagues. Participants will engage in an interactive activity that will demonstrate application of the theory as well as applicability to various settings.

By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the main components of the theory of synectics
  • Use the theory to create effective shortcuts to learning
  • Understand how to apply the theory to a broad array of personal and professional circumstances

Teaching and learning conversations

Creating Vibrant Learning Communities
with Dr. Ashley English

October 10, 2022 from 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Ashley English

Ashley English

As we collectively heal from difficulties caused by the pandemic, our need for relationships is evident. Students are adjusting to learning loss and feelings of isolation that resulted from significant time spent in virtual learning communities. Faculty members are recovering from challenges related to research productivity, caregiving responsibilities, and rediscovering their work community after being disconnected for extended periods. While we might be eager to explore relationship-building in personal contexts, academic communities can also benefit from reconnection.

The goal of this session is to think about the valuable role relationships play in creating dynamic, rigorous, and joyful learning environments that yield significant academic outcomes. As the 2022 winner of the Dean’s Teaching Award for the Bob Schieffer College of Communication, Dr. English will share her experience in personal development coaching, inspiration from inclusive teaching practices, and passion for creating active learning environments, to guide a discussion focused on building inclusive, vibrant learning communities that are rooted in relationships.

By participating in this workshop, you will:

  • Discuss the benefit of applying a coaching philosophy to your pedagogy
  • See examples of active learning and teaching strategies
  • Explore ways to enhance your teaching practices through guided reflection activities
  • Identify ways to strengthen teacher-student and student-student relationships going forward

Core Conversations

Teaching and Proposing Writing Emphasis Courses in the Core Curriculum
with Dr. Theresa Gaul and Dr. Carrie Leverenz

October 11, 2022 from 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Carrie Leverenz

Carrie Leverenz

Theresa Gaul

Theresa Gaul

If you’ve thought about proposing a Writing Emphasis (WEM) course or already teach one, you may have questions about how to best integrate writing instruction into your course and support your students in improving their writing skills.

This workshop will review pedagogical best practices in teaching writing in disciplines, provide concrete suggestions for implementing writing in a substantive way in your courses, and offer tips for evaluating and giving feedback on writing.

For those who are interested, the last part of the workshop will explain the submission process and offer tips on how to write a successful proposal.

*You are encouraged to bring a syllabus or assignment that you can refine in the workshop.


Core Conversations

Teaching in the Core Curriculum: An Overview
with Dr. Theresa Gaul

Rescheduled: October 26, 2022 from 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Theresa Gaul

Theresa Gaul

The TCU Core Curriculum is the very core of the TCU educational experience. With the goal of increasing faculty literacy and building a culture of engagement around the Core, this workshop presents an overview of the TCU Core Curriculum. It is designed for faculty members who are new to TCU, need a refresher on Core basics, or are interested in proposing a Core course. Topics include how to propose a course for a Core area, finding what you need on the new Core Curriculum website, and handling common advising questions.

By the end of this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Distinguish among areas and categories of the Core Curriculum
  • Describe the steps for proposing a new course
  • Navigate the Core Curriculum website
  • Locate answers to common advising questions

Learn more about the Core from Dr. Gaul’s feature in the Frog Blog: Core Curriculum 101.


pedagogy in practice

Exploring Inquiry-based Learning
with Dr. Mikaela Stewart

October 26, 2022 from 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Mikaela Stewart

Mikaela Stewart

Do you love witnessing those “light-bulb” moments when students put the pieces together to understand concepts? Do your students struggle to apply the material they are learning? Do you want to teach students skills in addition to content? Inquiry-based learning techniques may be for you!

In this workshop you will experience guided inquiry-based learning to examine the success of these techniques. These techniques are effective at increasing student learning and decreasing the number of students that drop or fail courses. Inquiry-based learning strategies have been used in large and small courses alike and across many fields as a way to teach students higher-order thinking skills while also delivering content. As an instructor, you’ll observe students work together to discover and apply course material and be able to correct misconceptions before they take root!

After attending this workshop you will be able to:

  • Describe an inquiry-based learning classroom from your own experience
  • List advantages of incorporating inquiry-based learning techniques into your classroom
  • Identify methods for overcoming challenges to inquiry-based learning

Teaching and learning conversations

Including Institutional History in Your Pedagogy with Dr. Sylviane Greensword and Dr. Frederick Gooding

October 28, 2022 from 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

In 2020, the TCU Chancellor and Board of Trustees launched the Race and Reconciliation Initiative (RRI)—an academic taskforce with the charge of investigating and documenting TCU’s relationship with slavery, racism, and the Confederacy. The end goal was not only to gain a deeper understanding of our institutional history, but also to create recommendations to support a campus where everyone is acknowledged, valued, and respected. The RRI has contributed greatly to TCU’s embracing of its active role in understanding and healing our community, our campus, and our classrooms. A culture of engaging pedagogy is instrumental in facilitating this healing process.

This workshop is thus designed to explore ways instructors can integrate the legacies of our complex racial history into our classrooms. At the end of this program, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role of collective memory in shaping campus and community culture
  • Navigate campus with an awareness of racial geography
  • Identify and describe key events of TCU’s history Locate and utilize information resources as well as RRI platforms that speak directly to your disciplines and/or your students’ cultural backgrounds

pedagogy in practice

Teaching with TCU’s Land Acknowledgment and Native American Monument
with Dr. Pablo Montes

November 14, 2022 from 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Pablo Montes

Pablo Montes

TCU’s recent adoption of a Native American Land Acknowledgment marks a significant step in the university’s efforts to be more inclusive and to develop mutually beneficial and respectful relationships with Native American nations and communities. Including the Land Acknowledgment on syllabi and websites, and in university activities is becoming more common on our campus. The Land Acknowledgment, and the closely related Native American monument, however, are powerful teaching tools, even for courses not necessarily considered part of the Native American Studies discipline.

Beyond reading and posting the Land Acknowledgment, it can be used to stimulate robust discussions, quiet reflection and contemplation, and critical thinking and writing on course topics and ideas. Students and teachers in far-ranging disciplines such as Business, History, STEM, Fine Arts, Political Science, Education, Religion, Philosophy, Modern Languages, Medicine, Nursing, Social Work, English, Athletics, and more will find the acknowledgment and monument useful in learning and teaching their courses’ concepts.

This workshop will address ways that TCU’s Land Acknowledgment and Native American monument can be used in courses to advance the values embedded within them, provide entry points into course topics, and guide and shape student engagement with course concepts.

In this workshop, participants will:

  • Explore the general nature and purpose of land acknowledgments and specific meanings reflected in TCU’s acknowledgment
  • Consider particular examples of how TCU’s acknowledgment and monument have been implemented in courses
  • Collaborate and work on ways that TCU’s acknowledgment and monument can be applied in their individual courses

By developing relevant applications to their courses and disciplines, participants will help make TCU’s Land Acknowledgment more than a written or read statement.

Read more about teaching with TCU’s Land Acknowledgment and Native American Monument.