Go to Student Audio & Video Resources

What are Audio & Video Tools?

Audio and Video files shared with your class online, whether the files are self-generated or created by others and used with permission.

Best practice for video and audio files uploaded online should be no more than 3-6 minutes in length. Content longer in duration should be edited to chunk the material into smaller digestible videos. Chunking material into smaller segments helps students retain information.


Getting Started

First, decide which media type is best for your content.

Then, Share Audio and Video.

Use existing audio or video

Use audio files produced by others, provided such use is permitted and copyright allows.

Generate your own audio files

  1. Gather your equipment: Most computers, tablets, and smartphones come equipped with all the necessary equipment to create sound files.  Sound will be best, however, if you use an external microphone. The Koehler Center has USB microphones available for faculty use; email elearning@tcu.edu to borrow one.
  2. Prepare for recording: Write your script and gather the materials you plan to talk about. This script should be used as a transcript for those needing accommodations for audio files. Review the Recording Tips for Audio page.
  3. Record your content:
    • In TCU Online: For instructors: Record Audio within the Announcements Tool, Assignment Submission folder properties, and Discussion posts. Select the “Record Audio” (within the Attachments section of the page).  Note: this works best in Chrome and Firefox browsers.
    • Record in software, edit and save the file. Select a third-party software, edit then save the file. There are several audio recording tools you can utilize depending on what type of computer or device you are using, your familiarity with making audio files, and how much editing of the file you want to do.  Note: If you plan to upload your file to TCU Online, an mp3 works best if you want it to play within content within the platform.  
    • New Media Writing Studio: TCU has a New Media Writing Studio (NMWS) that can assist you and your students with developing projects and assignments that use new media composing tools (i.e. podcasts, video projects, websites, etc.). You can meet with them for a consultation, have them visit your class to train students on specific tools or best practices, or encourage your students to drop in their open lab hours for assistance. The NMWS website includes real example projects, along with grading sheets and rubrics, as well as resources to help students learn the tools they might need to use.
    • The TCU Center for Instructional Services offers studio production, portable field production, post-production editing, media duplication, and distribution services. For assistance in recording & editing audio, please contact the Center for Instructional Services.

Generate your own video files

  1. Gather your equipment: If you are recording your own video, most computers, tablets, and smartphones come equipped with all the necessary equipment to create video files. Sound will be best, however, if you use an external microphone. The Koehler Center has USB microphones available for faculty use; email elearning@tcu.edu to borrow one.
  2. Prepare for recording: Write your script and gather the materials you plan to talk about. This script should be used as a transcript for those needing accommodations for video files. Review the Recording Tips for Video page.
  3. Record your content:
    • In TCU Online: Use the Video Note Tool. This is available within the HTML editor throughout TCU Online. Video is duration limited to 3 minutes. The Video Note tool works best in Chrome and Firefox browsers.  Brief Tutorial
    • Record in software, edit and save the file. Select a third-party software, edit then save the file.
    • New Media Writing Studio: TCU has a New Media Writing Studio (NMWS) that can assist you and your students with developing projects and assignments that use new media composing tools (i.e. podcasts, video projects, websites, etc.). You can meet with them for a consultation, have them visit your class to train students on specific tools or best practices, or encourage your students to drop in their open lab hours for assistance. The NMWS website includes real example projects, along with grading sheets and rubrics, as well as resources to help students learn the tools they might need to use.
    • The TCU Center for Instructional Services offers studio production, portable field production, post-production editing, media duplication, and distribution services. For assistance in recording & editing audio, please contact the Center for Instructional Services.

Share Audio and Video

The following are options for sharing audio and video in your TCU Online course.

Note: If you plan to upload an audio file to TCU Online, an mp3 works best if you want it to play within content within the platform.

Accessibility

  • Any time you include audio or video, you will want to include a transcript so that students with disabilities will also able to access the content.
  • If you are using a YouTube video, a transcript may already be available on the video page, indicated by the transcript icon.  You can copy and paste this for your students, but you will want to review the transcript to make sure it accurately reflects the entirety of the video content. YouTube transcripts are generally created with speech-to-text software, thus musical effects and other sounds may be omitted. If you are recording your own video and uploading it to YouTube, there is information available about YouTube captions and transcripts.
  • If your audio file comes from another source, you may need to type the transcript yourself, or use a website service such as Amara.
  • In TCU Online, you can place this transcript beneath the embedded audio or audio link, or post it as a separate content item.
  • For your students with visual impairments, you will also want to include a summary of any visual content necessary for understanding the video. For example, if the camera silently focuses on a graph, chart, document, or a key plot moment happens without dialogue or voiceover, you will need to summarize what the viewer is seeing. If on-screen text appears, students with color-impaired vision may not be able to see that text, depending on the color of the text. In this case, you will need to provide an alternate means to access that information.

Teaching with Audio & Video Tools

Audio and Video are a great way to boost student engagement and create a connection with your students. Self-generating audio or video will give your students both a better sense of who you are and what concepts you deem important.  Students are able to revisit the audio or video as many times as they need, allowing for self-paced learning and revision. Both audio and video can can grab students’ interest, spurring them to ask questions, make connections, and remember course content.

Learn more about providing alternative learning materials.

Examples of how audio and video can be used:

  • Video or audio introduction to the course
  • Record a podcast or short audio clip or video of yourself discussing course content
  • Record your screen as you show students how to access materials, use specialized software, or submit items.
  • If sound is the focus, an audio file would be more fitting, such as music, a nature recording, speech, interview, reading, radio story, or other sound clip pertinent to the course content.
  • If you prefer not to generate your own content, you can add audio or video produced by others, provided the copyright permissions allow it.
  • If a specific setting or speaker is the focus, a video might be more fitting.

Interested in learning more?

Audio and Video Tools Articles and Resources


Getting Help

Third-party software support

Support for third-party tools is provided by the companies producing the tools. The Koehler Center can offer limited assistance, although we do not primarily provide technical support for these products.

Additionally, if you are using the camera in your computer, tablet, or smartphone, you may wish to consult the relevant user manual for specific directions.

TCU Online Support

For help recording audio or video within TCU Online, or inserting your content into your course, contact support or come to a Faculty Open Lab.


Student Resources

Record your content:

In TCU Online:

  • Record Audio within the Assignment Submission folder and Discussion posts. Select the “Record Audio” (within the Attachments section of the page).  Note: this works best in Chrome and Firefox browsers.
    Student Submit Files
  • Additionally you can use Insert Stuff within the HTML Editor

Support

Contact support for assistance recording audio or video within TCU Online or attaching or embedding content to your submissions.